amaryllis (ranchero) 3/28/12

Weekly Photo Challenge: Surprise

Each Fall, I increase my Amaryllis collection with a new, specially researched bulb. Last year I purchased a Papilio hybrid and this year went even more exotic with Hippeastrum Cybister Evergreen.  Today I got the surprise of my life when i noticed a third flowerscape  in front of the strappy leaves at the container’s rim:  Yowzah ❗

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Hippeastrum Cybisters are a species of tropical bulb from South America whose flowers are thin and spidery-looking. Unlike their more common Amaryllis cousins, cybisters keep their leaves year-round. This particular cultivar is evergreen in another way, too—when the buds open they’ll (hopefully!) look like this picture, (pasted from the catalogue at parkseed.com🙂 )

Hippeastrum Cybister Evergreen

If you’re even the slightest bit interested in growing Amaryllis or Cybisters , I highly recommend reading Trends in Modern Hippeastrum Hybridizing.

Until next time…..

🙂 🙂 🙂

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Delicate (2nd Submission)

Late Fall/early Winter is one of Indian River County’s best growing seasons. While doing my garden walkabout today, I noticed some very delicate blossoms on my Mystery Plant:

Mystery plant, Ranchero, 12/21/12

Although it’s shot up another foot and grown quite bushy (with lots of buds! 🙂 ), I’m still no closer to naming it.  The flowers hint at centaurea but the leaves are all wrong. 😎 If anything comes to mind, please let me know! (Clicking on the picture will enlarge it for a better look.)

This next delicate beauty is popping up all over the place: containers, flower beds, even the backyard grass…I’ve counted 17 so far;  strange, since last winter I saw only one and not ’til the holidays were long passed.

Soldier Orchid, Vero Beach, 12/21/12Soldier Orchid, Vero Beach, 12/21/12

Soldier’s Orchid (aka Zeuxine Strateumatica) originated in Southeast Asia.  In 1936, the species spread through Florida via seedbags of centipede grass imported from China. Because of their spontaneous, almost weed-like appearance in open fields (or yards like mine) scientists assume this delicate species is not dependent on insect pollinators. Most likely they self fertilize/create seeds internally by an apomictic reproduction process….and somehow 3 of those seeds jumped into this Caladium pot! 🙂

Zeuxine strateumatica growing in the Caladium pot, 12/21/12

Nature sure is surprising!

And with that, I leave you to the walking, smiley, present guys:

sxmas_present_100-100sxmas_present_100-100sxmas_present_100-100

….while you’re waiting for Santa, check out other interpretations of delicate in the Zemanta links below!

Merry Christmas!!!

Nasturtium Dwarf Cherry Rose

Weekly Photo Challenge: Delicate

For this week’s photo challenge, WordPress asks that we share something delicate. Immediately, I thought of showing you one of my birthday gifts: Presents

 

Lancaster Glass Sunshine Pattern Platter

Since the millennium, I’ve amassed a nice collection of 100yr old glassware, with a special emphasis on pink.  Last week I was thrilled to receive this lovely, delicate  platter as a present from my mother; ( 🙂 yup! I’m a Sagittarius…what’s YOUR sign!?!)

This new-to-me Depression Glass plate was produced circa 1932 by Lancaster Glass Company in pink, soft-green, and topaz.  Originally it was sold under the Sunshine pattern, but was renamed “Lana” in 1974.  The bottom of every Sunshine piece is made from clear glass in a cane-like pattern.  The rest of the item can either be clear (like mine) or satinized like this one.

For further information on Depression Glass (and a peek at a GREAT collection) visit Kejaba’s Treasure Store.

Until next time……

🙂 🙂

Weekly Photo Challenge: Change of Seasons

In my neck of the woods, Aloe flowerspikes scream Change of Season almost as much as cars with northern license plates! 😉  While puttering in my rear garden this morning, I noticed an Aloe Ciliaris  sporting a healthy looking inflorescense:

Aloe Ciliaris Flower Spike, 12/14/12

Like most aloes, A. Ciliaris hails from Africa (mine came from Target, though! ha! 😉 ) When planted from seed, this vining climber grows FAST, but often takes 2-3 years to bear bright orange/red flowers. In their fully opened state, the flowers are approximately an inch long and tubular shaped, hanging in loose clusters from cone shaped racemes.

Until next time…..

🙂 🙂

ps. You can visit other Change of Season interpretions via the Zemanta links below:

Neoregelia spp

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

After yesterday’s downpour, my plants were adorned with lingering raindrops. I liked how this Passiflora belotti leaf caught the reflection of barely emerging sunlight:

Passiflora Belotti foliage

The overflowing “tank” of my Neoregelia Spectabilis  mirrored the Bauhinia tree above it: note the reflection of branches on the tank’s righthand side:

Neoregelia Spectabilis, 12/06/12

Reflection is not just physics and lightwaves; it describes behavioural elements, too ➡ hover your mouse over the picture to see what I mean! HA!

Passiflora belotti flower bud, 12/07/12

😉 😉

Until next time…..

Weekly Photo Challenge: Thankful

I’m surprised WordPress saved this topic ’til AFTER Thanksgiving day 😯 but no matter; the approach of year’s end always brings about reflection. What good things happened? What bad? What do I appreciate most…or least?  At the heart of these ruminations runs gratitude..I’m thankful I can awaken each day and experience whatever life has in store for me.  NA/AA refers to it as accepting (and dealing with) “life on life’s terms,” and I’m thankful I’m able to do it. 🙂

In early November I “made” this online poster combining one of my favorite American Indian quotations with a picture of my super cosmos . If you’ve already seen it on Facebook, I hope you don’t mind I’ve recycled it for this week’s challenge. 🙂

gratitude

Until next time….

🙂 🙂 🙂

For other interpretations of thankful, click on the links below.

Green transport, green leaves

Weekly Photo Challenge: Green

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone! I hope the day surrounded you with family, friends and festivities! 🙂   Instead of cooking, we celebrated at Mulligan’s Beach House, where I kept an eye out for all things green, the topic of this week’s photo challenge. :mrgreen:

In the gallery that follows, you’ll see:

  • kitschy blue-green bench
  • green roof
  • green ocean
  • green tropical plants seen through my shadow
  • people who feel green from eating too much
  • green transportation to work off the “too much” :mrgreen:

Until next time…..

🙂 🙂 :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 🙂 🙂

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