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Ruralside, Vero Beach

Although I’ve shared many pictures of Beachside, Vero Beach, I’ve never shown you the rural belt along the western edge of town.  For today’s Wordless Wednesday (mostly!) I thought I’d share pictures of a friend’s farmlet property in this lovely and quiet area.

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The new fence looks really pretty!

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and here’s the reason for said fence:

This horse thinks she’s human!

Her horse kept coming on the porch and looking in the windows…esp when it rained! :) :)

FYI, I’ve been posting less for several reasons: Maggie moved back in a few weeks ago and we’ve been busy reorganizing the house, cleaning the garage, baking for fun, and trying to learn a bit of Icelandic–we leave on our trip two weeks from this very minute!

We’ve also been shopping, shopping (and more shopping) having realized Florida wardrobes are completely inadequate for Iceland/England/France in September.  Finding warm gear in stores here was challenging but we finally purchased everything we need including full raingear and rubber boots.  Now we’re just keeping fingers crossed Bárðarbunga doesn’t blow until after 9/10!

Until next time…

:) :) :)

Wordless Wednesday: 8/20/14 (Mushroom Cloud)

Check out these crazy clouds forming off Jaycee Beach.  (Photos taken 3mins apart at 12:30pm, 8/15/14)

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As the storm coalesced and the rain began, it looked a lot like a nuclear mushroom cloud.  We made it off the beach just as it REALLY started coming down!

For more on Wordless Wednesday, click the WW blog/linkup at the Jenny Evolution

Until next time…

:) :) :)

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Partridge Pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata)

Partridge Pea is a North American wildflower growing from Massachusetts to Michigan and southward to the Gulf Coast states. During August it blooms profusely along the Jaycee boardwalk:

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Chamaecrista fasciculata, Jaycee Beach 8/17/14

C. fasciculata is typically 1-3ft tall with similar spread; each compound leaf has up to 20 leaflets that contract when touched. The bright yellow flowers have an open irregular shape with 5 rounded petals that vary in size.  They appear near the leaf axils along the major (green) stems.

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Following fertilization, Partridge pea bears typical legume-style fruit in the form of narrow pods measuring 2.5″ long. Right now the pods are bright green and pliable, but by October they’ll be brown, dry, and bursting with flat pitted seeds.

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Partridge pea grows from a long central taproot that favors sandy/disturbed areas. It establishes readily, fixes nitrogen, and reseeds year-to-year making it an excellent choice for controlling beach erosion.

For an in depth look at C. fasciculata, click on this .pdf file from the Florida Native Plant Society.

Until next time….

:) :) :)

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Wordless Wednesday: 8/13/14 (Siam Tulip)

My smartphone’s charging port crapped out after my last post (no smartphone = no camera/photos.) I finally got it repaired and can’t tell you how good it feels to take pictures again. :)  The blog is back in time for Wordless Wednesday.

Siam tulips are Florida late summer bloomers and I look forward to their arrival every August!

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Curcuma alismatifolia, Maejo Mont Blanc

Although the inflorescence resembles a northern style tulip, this plant is a member of the Ginger family specifically Curcuma alismatifolia with bracts ranging from pure white to deep purple. Mine are a pink tinged hybrid named Maejo Mont Blanc.

For more on Wordless Wednesday, click the WW blog/linkup at the Jenny Evolution.

Until next time….

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Flame Lily Update: It’s Opening!

A few weeks ago, my Gloriosa superba vines were barely in bud.  Now they’ve branched in several directions and even started opening.

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G. Superba, 8/5/14

Each Flame Lily is borne on a single leaf axis and typically takes 17days to complete the flowering cycle.  The photo above was taken yesterday at 8:30AM and the one below around 3:00PM.  As the blossoms mature, the tepals elongate and wrinkle, eventually arching upward as seen below.  Six stamens encircle a longer “eyelash” pistil that points to the side in an adaptation that discourages self fertilization: any pollen released from the stamens will fall below the pistil.

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Looking at it this morning, it’s easy to see how G. superba got its common name!

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G. superba, 8/6/14

It really DOES resemble flames against the sky!!

Until next time…

:) :) :)

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Zigzag

This week’s photo challenge asks us to share a story with jagged lines: mine begins with a zigzag of waves along Humiston Beach.

Zigzag surf line at Humiston Beach, 8/2/14

Zigzag surf line at Humiston Beach, 8/2/14

We’ve had so much rain this summer and precious few good/long beach days! The next two pictures show the zigzag advance of threatening clouds. Strong winds off the Atlantic held them shy of our position but beachgoers a few miles north weren’t so lucky: note the sheet of rain falling behind the lifeguard umbrella:

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Off to the south it wasn’t much better: more zigzags rolling in. :eek:

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At the exact time Maggie and I were tanning and snacking ;),  Ivana was running the bridge from the mainland. She snapped a fantastic shot of an Osprey with zigzag wings!

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It’s so nice when the weather cooperates, isn’t it?

For other interpretations of zigzag, check out the Zemanta related links below.

Until next time….

:) :) :)

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Wordless Wednesday: 7/30/14 (Verbena Surprise)

I love when flowers appear unexpectedly!

This “volunteer” is a phlox variety  although the leaves seem a bit veiny?  I’ve included additional pics from different angles so let me know if you can I.D. it!

(Edit: 8/3/14: The comments overwhelmingly identified this plant as a Verbena, specifically Verbena canadensis ‘Rosea.’  See comment from Theshrubqueen below)

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Somehow it grew in a perfectly located forgotten container! Such a nice accent for the pink Fingerpaint brom (Neoregelia spectabilis.)

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…here’s another view with Gaillardia Torch Red Ember in the background.

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Seed germination in unexpected spots is not as easy as you might think! Recently, my blog friend–a felllow Treasure Coast resident–George Rogers wrote a VERY informative, entertaining post on the subject.

For more on Wordless Wednesday, click the WW blog/linkup at the Jenny Evolution.

Until next time….

:) :) :)

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